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PROTEASE DEFICIENCY CONDITIONS: Protease digests protein. What happens when you are protease deficient? You will have protein deficiency symptoms, depending on how deficient you are in protease. Protease deficiency creates alkaline excess in the blood.

This is not because protease itself is acidic; it is not. Acidity is created through the digestion of protein with protease. Some people may be vegetarian not by choice, but because they are protease deficient and cannot digest protein. Since acidity comes from the digestion of protein with protease, protease-deficient people may have an alkaline excess which can produce anxiety states. Often people take tranquilizers such as Xanex and then they zombie around in a fog, when simply taking protease can, through increased digestion of protein, acidify them to HOMEOSTASIS with resulting relief of their anxiety.

Homeostasis is the dynamic equilibrium within the body. Without successful physiological homeostasis (balance), in which relatively constant conditions are maintained in the internal environment, the body cannot survive. The maintenance of homeostasis involves a number of factors in addition to metabolism, such as water intake and retention, acid-base balance, excretion of waste matter and control of body temperature. In other words our body will do whatever it must to stay in homeostasis.

Protein is also required to carry protein-bound calcium in the blood. Insufficient protein-bound calcium lays the foundation for arthritis and other calcium deficient diseases. Why? When the blood cannot carry calcium because it lacks protein, it withdraws the necessary calcium from the bones to maintain homeostasis. This situation is aggravated in people who take calcium carbonate supplements, such as Tums or other antacids, because this adds to the alkaline stress on the blood. The blood cannot carry ionic calcium as efficiently because ionic calcium requires a certain level of acidity to be present.

Overly alkaline people have a multitude of calcium metabolism problems, such as osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, gouty arthritis, degenerative disc problems, bone spurs and related disorders such as sciatica and ligament problems.

Because 46% of digested protein is converted to glucose upon demand, inadequate protein digestion leads to hypoglycemia (hypoglycemia also has other causes such as hypothyroidism and vitamin deficiency). Symptoms include moodiness, mood swings and irritability among many others.

Water follows protein (literally). Inadequate protein in the blood also means inadequate water. Where does the water go? Into the tissues after the protein! This causes tissue swelling (edema ). Water is forced into the capillaries and into the tissues by the pressure of blood being pumped around the body. By a reverse process, which depends on the water-drawing power of the proteins in the blood, it is reabsorbed in the capillaries from the tissues. These two mechanisms need to remain in balance.

Protein maldigestion leads to a toxic colon. People in this category often have problems in the area of the descending colon (lower right quadrant of the abdomen). This includes developing appendicitis and even more serious problems such as mucous colitis and even colon cancer.

Another of the most common results of protein maldigestion is chronic ear infections and fluid in the ears, especially in children. This is a protease calcium deficiency. To drain fluids from the middle ear, you must increase protease in the blood.

Protease will pull water out of the middle ear, and also the ankles, hands and feet during PMS, and put it back into the blood.

Protease is also involved in the immune system via its action on bacterial debris, certain viruses, and its ability to break down circulating immune complexes. Protease has an ability to digest unwanted debris in the blood and should be considered your friendly blood cleanser. Protease deficient people are immune compromised, making them susceptible to bacterial, viral and yeast Infections and a general decrease in immunity. Protease deficient women are predisposed towards PMS. The only people who cannot tolerate protease are those who suffer from ulcers, gastritis or hiatus hernias. The already damaged mucosal tissue cannot handle the extra acidity from the digested protein AMYLASE DEFICIENCY CONDITIONS: Amylase digests carbohydrates or polysaccharides into smaller disaccharide units, eventually converting them into monosaccharides such as glucose. People who are fat intolerant (can't digest fats) often eat sugar and carbohydrates to make up for the lack of fat in their diet. If their diet is excessive in carbohydrates, they develop an amylase deficiency and symptoms arising therefrom.

Amylase digests not only carbohydrates but also dead white blood cells (pus). For example, when you are low in amylase you are a candidate for abscesses (areas with pus but not bacteria). if you have a toothache and are being treated with antibiotics, but it doesn't go away, chances are you may have an abscess.

Amylase is involved in anti-inflammatory reactions such as those caused by the release of histamine and similar substances.

The inflammatory response usually occurs in organs which are in contact with the outside world such as the lungs and skin.

These include skin problems such as psoriasis, eczema, hives, insect bites, allergic bee and bug stings. atopic dermatitis, and all types of herpes. The lung problems including asthma and emphysema require amylase plus other enzyme formulas depending on the particular condition.

Carbohydrates require phosphorus. If excess refined carbohydrates are consumed, a phosphorus deficiency will result.

Phosphorus deficiencies include: thick blood, tendency towards gastritis (inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract) and stiff joints, especially in the morning. Why stiff joints? Adequate phosphorus prevents the deposit of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate in the joints. If phosphorus is deficient due to excess consumption of sugar, joint pain results from deposits of oxalates and carbonates Phosphorus deficiency is often accompanied by thick blood and high blood pressure. Please do not feel you can run out and get a phosphorus supplement to solve this problem. Quite the contrary. The only way the calcium and phosphorus can be balanced is by getting them both from the foods in which they originate in a natural, balanced proportion.